Out of the black, into the blue – Lana Del Rey’s Lust for Life

Lana Del Fuckin’ Rey did it again. She released a new album and it’s a bewitching, breathtaking audiovisual journey as usual. The work is called Lust for Life (it rolls off the tongue well), and it already sounded like a change in artistic direction for Del Rey. No more gloom and sadness? While dark Hollywood tales still have their room on the new record, the singer seems to have accepted fame and the shit it comes with, but also she accepted herself. Familiar love stories are included, but at some  Lust for Life surprisingly gets political too, and the issues she’s trying to raise are well-thought out. Lana Del Rey is fully grown now. ‘Gone is the burden’, she says. It’s like taking off the weighted clothing in Dragon Ball Z, making your power levels spike. Continue reading →

Sensual Honeymoon with Lana Del Rey

featureLana Del Rey’s 3rd studio album has been out for several weeks now and I couldn’t be happier about getting more of that dark and gloomy pop music the singer is famous for. Honeymoon follows in the footsteps of its predecessor, telling stories of bad guys, toxic relationships, the radiance, and the darkness of Hollywood. Lana Del Rey’s jazzy brand of spiritual self-reflection is conveyed through complex, grandiose and dreamy sound. The songstress also remembers to pay homage to the same artists she seeks inspiration from. Continue reading →

Re-defining violence with Lana Del Rey, re-visiting Nebraska with Springsteen and Shiina Ringo’s Reimport deal

titleVideo Games was the first Lana Del Rey song I heard and it intrigued me from the very start. The song stood out among other tunes played on the radio – it was hauntingly beautiful and dreamy, but the lyrics had this rare dark, depressing overtone, which you cannot easily forget. Then Summertime Sadness and Dark Paradise came along and although these two did not leave as much of impression on me as Video Games, they convinced me that this singer was amazing at conveying emotions and had a fascinating, gloomy voice. Continue reading →

Re-defining violence with Lana Del Rey, re-visiting Nebraska with Springsteen and Shiina Ringo's Reimport deal

title

Video Games was the first Lana Del Rey song I heard and it intrigued me from the very start. The song stood out among other tunes played on the radio – it was hauntingly beautiful and dreamy, but the lyrics had this rare dark, depressing overtone, which you cannot easily forget. Then Summertime Sadness and Dark Paradise came along and although these two did not leave as much of impression on me as Video Games, they convinced me that this singer was amazing at conveying emotions and had a fascinating, gloomy voice. Continue reading →